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DnD 5e - The Triton Handbook

Last Updated: August 28th, 2020

Disclaimer

This guide uses the color coding scheme which has become common among Pathfinder build handbooks, which is simple to understand and easy to read at a glance.

  • Red: Bad, useless options, or options which are extremely situational.
  • Orange: OK options, or useful options that only apply in rare circumstances.
  • Green: Good options.
  • Blue: Fantastic options, often essential to the function of your character.

I will not include 3rd-party content, including content from DMs Guild, even if it is my own, because I can't assume that your game will allow 3rd-party content or homebrew. I also won't cover Unearthed Arcana content because it's not finalized, and I can't guarantee that it will be available to you in your games.

Introduction

Want to play a mermaid, but can't handle the lack of legs? Playing in an underwater campaign, but you still want to be mostly human? Enter the Triton! An amphibious humanoid capable of thriving in a variety of classes and environs. In terms of personality, tritons are duty-driven and noble, but overbearing. Basically, if you took a paladin stereotype and made it a fish person, you would end up with a triton.

Mechanically, the Triton has a lot to offer. Ability increases to three ability scores is rare (only the Half-Elf, the Triton, and the default Human), and it's a great spread. Darkvision, damage resistance, amphibious, and you can talk to anything that can breath water (one-way only; they don't get to talk back unless they already could. I don't know how the spell Water Breathings works with this, but ask your DM.). On top of that, you get innate spellcasting. The effects are situational so it's not a major defining trait, but it's still nice.

Classes

Artificer

No Intelligence increase.

Barbarian

Strength and Constitution are great, but the Barbarian has little use for Charisma and the innate spellcasting can't be used while you're raging.

Bard

Strength-based builds are extremely difficult for the Bard, but the Constitution and Charisma increases are great. If you can make it to level 3 College of Valor will get you medium armor, so you can get by on just 14 Dexterity, but you may have better lucky simply ignoring your Strength increase.

Cleric

Bad ability spread.

Druid

Bad ability spread.

Fighter

The Triton makes a fine fighter. Strength and Constitution are great, and the innate spellcasting offer some useful options, but the Paladin is a better fit because it makes better use of the Triton's ability score increases. The Purple Knight can still make good use of the Charisma increase, of course, but since so few other fighter subclasses get Face skills or Charisma-based abilities it can be very difficult to bring Charisma into play.

Monk

Three ability increases, but none are to Dexterity or Wisdom.

Paladin

The Triton's ability scores perfectly match what the Paladin needs. if you use the "point buy" method for your ability scores, you could start with 16 in Strength, Constitution, and Charisma. That's pretty great, but you'll have 8s everywhere else which hurts.

Ranger

The Triton's ability scores don't work great for the Ranger. Strength-based builds are possible, but they're hard.

Rogue

No Dexterity increase.

Sorcerer

Constitution and Charisma are a great start, and the combination of Amphibious and innate spellcasting will offer you some additional tools without requiring you to learn those spells.

Warlock

Constitution and Charisma are a great start, and for a Hexblade you could build around Strength instead of Dexterity if you're brave enough to try it in medium armor. Innate spellcasting is always welcome on warlocks due to their limited spell slots.

Wizard

No Intelligence increase.